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Have I Caught You at A Good Time?

That's a question that a lot of sales and marketing people have been taught to ask as part of their sales training. Using the telephone for sales and marketing is an art form. Some people are naturals and have a strong intuitive sense about the party on the other end of the line. Conversely some are simply clueless to all but the most blatant direct statements. In this era of increasing B2B telemarketing(spam if you will) legitimate sales calls are meeting with less tolerances and shorter attention spans.

So what's a marketer to do? Hire well, of course, get the best telephone intuitives that you can. Beyond that you can train your people to always have a WIFM(What's in it for me) Benefit for person they are calling. Always do their homework so they have value to add to the person, the business, the sale or the relationship BEFORE making the call. This is a lot like developing the content for your e-marketing newsletter. The content and headlines need to be of value to the recipient or they won't bother reading it and interacting with the offers you are making. And forget about future e-mail newsletters.

Yes, people are busy and not always available to talk to a marketer but over time they will equate your call with the WIFM and realize that it's in their best interest to take your call.

November 22, 2004 in award winning newsletter, Blog Outsourcing, blog publish, build credibility, Building B2B Relationships, Building Customer Community, Building Customer Intuition, bulk email marketing, Business Marketing, Business newsletter, Business publications, Business relationships, CMO | Permalink

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Comments

I've found that one of the best ways to cold call in to a prospect is to use similar techniques for pitching a story idea to editors. Get them with a 15 second pitch that completely captivates them and then offer other angles about your product or service that are most relevant to them. Don't even mention who you are or what you're selling. Get them with a good hook and they will ask you to tell them more.

Great blog. Keep up the good work.

David

Posted by: David Wells | May 2, 2005 2:03:49 PM